RPGaDay: Favourite game you no longer play

On August 28th, the topic of the day is my favourite game I no longer play. Since 1990, I have played many different games. I have enjoyed many of those games. Only one comes straight in my mind that I wish to play again but I haven’t played in several years. The game system is Fudge by Steffan O’Sullivan.

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Fudge is a universal system which uses a descriptive trait ladder. Yeah, a few years ago, I played a few sessions of Deryni Adventure Game which uses the Fudge system. In the late 1990s, I played a lot of the Fudge system. I played the role of GM for my own fantasy campaign, which I had modified from D&D. I was GM for one-shots at conventions.

In fact, at conventions (most notably CanGames), I would give out dice to players who participated in my adventures. I would either buy them or the wonderful Ann Dupuis of Grey Ghost Press, Inc would send me boxes of Fudge dice to give. Ann Dupuis was very generous of the amount of dice she would ship out. I stopped running Fudge at CanGames when I started having trouble mustering enough players for an adventure.

At conventions, my favourite Fudge game to play was Terra Incognita. I’ve spoken about it before over here.

For my Fudge campaign, I called it the Pheonix Experiment. It was trying to restore a world known as Beta Pictoris. I got the name from an article I read in high school of a potential discovered planet and their speculation on its conditions. I expanded on it and it was a world which was the source of magic in the universe. The setting was science fantasy with ether ships from Earth exploring the cosmos. The campaign started out in AD&D 2nd during my university years. I decided to return to the world and moved it 10 years later.

In Fudge setting, the world of Beta Pictoris was destroyed. The source of magic had shattered and various factions based on different schools of magic were trying to re-establish magic but on their own terms. If you were a magic user, the source of magic you tapped would fluctuate based on location and time. The amount of fluctuation was based on how far or close were the school from where you were. A narrative decision to determine a mechanical modifier. One major NPC returned from the original AD&D2nd camapgn, Norak, an elf illusionist who was now living through life support & interacting with the character as an illusion.

The group in that campaign were varied. Brenda played Sal, a human rogue who made pacts with shadow and go a shadow servant. A friend played a naga exiled princess with a manservant who had a shadowy past (he was an assassin sent by her family but we never got to finish that story). Another friend played a hobgoblin barbarian. Someone played a halfling healer and someone played a human necromancer with a sentient skeletal horse familiar. I played the skeletal horse family like Eeyore and one it got them into trouble.

Once, the horse remembered it hadn’t eaten in awhile so figured it must be hungry. It left the area near the dungeon entrance where it was left and went to the local village. It caused quite a stir in the village who had never seen this skeletal horse. Luckily, the party rescued the village from the skeletal horse who had been eating the horse feed and scaring the other horses.

I have other stories from that campaign like when the group decided to ignore the adventure and spent an evening at a dwarven tavern getting hilariously drunk. The player who was the shy halfling healer described how her drunk character was offering body shots by the end of the night. In the morning, the group had to rescue the hobgoblin from being dissected by the tavern owner’s daughter who had aspirations to enter the medical field.

I have fond memories of the Fudge system. I’d return to it in a heartbeat and I miss not playing it these days.

What game have you highly enjoyed playing and you miss? What fun stories do you have of your play?

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